Posted by Craig Borlase on 7 August 2017

With Pentecost Sunday – June 4th – just around the corner, we look back at one of the greatest revivals of all. Take a look and a listen and you’ll see that there’s something powerful embedded within this worship encounter from Darlene Zschech.  In many ways, moments like the final minute – where the air grows heavy and the praise lifts off – they’re nothing new. There are millions of Christians worldwide today who worship in churches where scenes like these are familiar. But if we turn the clock back 111 years and head to Azusa Street, Los Angeles, we can witness the birth of a remarkable new move of God that nobody had seen before. Enter William Seymour, the Louisiana-born son of ex-slaves, blind in one eye, quietly spoken, prayerful, radical African American preacher. In 1906 he had been invited to pastor a small, mainly black church in Los Angeles. He was still new...

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