Posted by Craig Borlase on 21 February 2018

If ever you wonder where God would have you work, go and be among the poor and the powerless. It’s what His son did. And it’s what all the heroes of the Bible understood…



‘I was eyes to the blind and feet to the lame. I was a father to the needy; I took up the case of the stranger. I broke the fangs of the wicked and snatched the victims from their teeth.’

[Job 29]


What does is mean to be a successful Christian? The question’s certainly a little clumsy, and possibly a bit ridiculous, but stay with us, will you? It seems that if you're after a solid example of Godly success in human form, you could do worse than look at Job.

Nothing can shake his faith. Not four back-to-back catastrophes, not the fact that his wealth and family are taken from him, and not the sores that cover his body. Whatever he faces, he continues to trust God.


Because, over a lifetime of demonstrating the love of God to those on the margins, he learned that true success, if it can be measured at all, is not charted by wealth or status. Job understood the deep and profound truth that God is calling each of us to allow our lives to beat in time with His heart for the poor.

Job was a man whose worship went beyond the songs and out into the world. This was a man who was truly great.


Do something that demonstrates God’s love for someone poor or powerless.

This is not a request that you part with some of your money, time or talent to bless someone less fortunate than yourself. It’s an invitation to step closer to where God would have you, and where He will meet you.


Heavenly Father, we live in a world that sometimes seems to be so at odds with your values. Show us how to live well, right where we are. Teach us to trust you.


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