Posted by Craig Borlase on 18 September 2014

For those of you out there who write songs, who choose the songs that are sung in church, or who in any way say things to help people as they unite to worship in song, here’s a little video that we think you should watch.


The way we respond to words is a constantly changing process. Meaning is not static. Generations use words in wildly different ways. Expressions that move us one year can grow stale and tired the next. We can too easily become immune to the power of a phrase that once sank us to our knees or set our hands firing up into the air. And when we grow tired, we become blind to the greater truths that these words would lead us onto.

And yet we follow a God who creates, a God who breathes, a God who uses all our sense to lay out as trail that leads us to Him.

Let’s not settle for the familiar just because it’s an easy and obvious fit. Let’s not use words like lego blocks. Let’s not settle for easy formula and standard descriptors. Our God - and the people He loves - deserve better than that.

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