Posted by Craig Borlase on 17 February 2017

Is your life what you thought it would be? When you think about it, is this really what you hoped? Are you making the kind of difference that you aimed for?

Some of you will answer yes. Not out of arrogance or pride, but because within you there’s a sense that the way you’re using some of your talents and resources is the way that God has called you to use them. You’ve made a habit of saying yes to God, of taking risks (and making mistakes), and somehow you’ve got caught up in a wonderful adventure. You’ve not had enough yet, and you’re aware that the longer you travel with God, the wider the horizon grows ahead of you, but – honestly – you know that life is working out far better than you could have imagined, and you’re totally thankful to God for that.

OK, so that’s some of us. But what about the rest? What about those among us whose hands don’t immediately shoot straight up when we’re asked ‘who’s living out their God-given vision right now?’ What about those who aren’t even really all that sure that they even have a God-given vision for their life, let alone be living it?

To anyone who’s ever agonized over the question "what does God want for my life?", here are a few simple thoughts that we hope will help…

1. Don’t confuse activity with productivity. Too often we look at people we admire and assume that what they are doing is what we need to copy. The inner journey of faith matters far more than the outer. Being a disciple of Jesus is not so much about what we do as what we become.

2. God’s vision for your life is same as God’s vision for my life is the same as God’s vision for Peter, Paul-and-every-other-pillar-of-the-early-church’s-life: become a disciple of Christ. Where that leads us to will vary for each of us, but at the core of every Christian is the same singular vision of following and serving Jesus.

3. The Church is good at doing stuff for people, and bad at dong stuff with people. We need to stop trying to make a difference and focus our efforts on being a difference. Back in the days when parents longed for their children to become fully fledged disciples of beloved Rabbis, there was a saying: the disciple wears the dust of the Rabbi. Being a disciple of Jesus means the same thing today that it meant two thousand years ago: to learn to hear Him, to follow Him and to say yes to Him with all that we have.

That’s it. That’s the singular vision that unites us all.

With thanks to Dr Charlie Weir, Lead Pastor Gateway Church, Franklin for the inspirational sermon on Sunday 5th Feb

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