Posted by Lex Buckley on 7 October 2013

Recruiting new musicians
One of the main responsibilities a worship pastor has is to recruit new musicians into the worship team. For some this may seem like a straightforward task – if they can play music, they are in! However, being a musician or singer on a worship team is not just a servant role, it’s also a leadership role. The worship team members are usually in a prominent place in the church; not only are they setting an example to others, they are also representing the values of your church. So it’s crucial that you bring musicians into the team who are not only musical but who uphold the values of your church and set an example that you would encourage others to follow. As a worship pastor, it’s important to know who is being put in that leadership role – for everyone’s sake, the individual’s, the worship team’s and the church’s. In order to help you recruit musicians that will be a blessing to your worship team and your church, I want to share with you the qualities that are important to look for.

But first…

Get to know them!
Many musicians move to a new church enthusiastic about getting involved in the worship team, and they are likely to approach you as the worship pastor and let you know they are interested in joining. It can be tempting to let them start playing up front straight away, particularly if they are a great musician or if you really need that instrument in your band. Even so, it is my advice that you let them be part of the church for four to six months before they get involved. This is something that my husband and I have found to be wise, and it’s a boundary that we put in place for four reasons.

First, it gives us a chance to get to know them; we aren’t going to be able to answer any of the other questions we may have if we haven’t spent any time with them and got to know them!

Secondly, it gives them a period of time where they can attend church with no responsibilities. Musicians are often burned out from being involved in church services week in and week out, and so when someone begins attending our church we want to bless them and give them time and space to rest and be filled up again.

Thirdly, in my experience some musicians move to a new church with wounds they have received from their time on other worship teams. So this brief stretch of downtime is a great opportunity for them to receive healing and freedom. If they were to jump straight back into up-front ministry, those wounds may not get dealt with. It is better for them and for the team if they begin the journey of healing before joining.

Finally, this time period also enables us to see whether they are committed to the church. Are they involved in the church in other ways. Are they part of a small group? Do they attend church regularly? Do they attend church-wide events? It’s important to have people on the worship team who are committed to and excited about the vision of the church.

 

parts 2 and 3 to follow... 

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