Posted by Craig Borlase on 24 April 2015

We live in a global village. 

Yeah, yeah, yeah, you say. Pull the other cliche. 

Globalisation is old news. There's no surprise in seeing the golden arches of maccy d's in Dubai and there’s nothing unusual about watching a product launch that features consumers from every part of the globe. 

A couple of decades ago was the time for marvelling at how small the world had become. Why post about it now?

Because maybe for us in the world of worship it’s not helping. Maybe as the world gets smaller and the sounds get more similar and the styles get squashed together and the ideas morph into one another, maybe we’re losing something. And maybe we’re getting boring.

Maybe there was something good about the days when worship from another country would seem foreign, unusual, even a little awkward on our lips. Those days made us stop and think. They made us ask questions. They made us realise that we’re just pebbles on the beach, not the giant boulders we can sometimes be fooled into believing we are.

Sure there were awkward bits about that - what family gathering isn’t without a few odd characters and rough edges - but those points of difference were not something to be swept away. They were to be cherished, celebrated. We’re not same and we shouldn’t try to be.

Or maybe you see it the other way. The shrinking of the world and the increase in ease of communication has created something that we struggled with before. Unity. When we sing together we strengthen the ties that bind us. And when we share the same sounds it reminds us how we share the same goals. 

Whatever your take, those days when we were strangers on board this planet are gone. We’re unable to unplug, aren’t we? We’re hard wired in to the way the world’s run, and there’s nothing we can do to change it. 

That doesn’t sound dull.  It sounds dangerous.

More like this

Putting Christ Back Into Carols

Every November it was always the same; take down the Christmas file and pull out the classic Christmas carols. And every year I experienced the same mixed emotions… On one hand it was always good to be reacquainted with these songs....

My Top 5 Leadership Books with Ian Matthews

Ian Matthews heads up David C Cook books in the UK, working with British authors such as Mike Pilavachi, Roy Godwin and Matt Redman. Prior to that he ran the UK division Zondervan, and has worked with publishers across the world. Here he gives us his Top 5 books on leadership. Worship Leaders like you, can focus on the 'worship' resources, but what about your skills of leadership.....sometimes, this is the one thing you need to give more time to.

what do you need to detach from?

Sometimes we can get a little too good at making worship cocktails. We get used to adding so-called essentials like justice, intimacy, abandonment, warfare, to our sung worship that we reach a point where we simply need to detach. Trouble is, detaching is a seriously frightening business...