Posted by Craig Borlase on 10 July 2015

This week I met a man who had lost almost everything.  After his successful business was hijacked by the state he was given just twenty-four hours to flee his homeland with his children. He arrived in England last month and faces an anxious wait while his wife does what she can to get some of their money out of the banks and bring it with her when she joins them next month.

There’s a chance that she won’t succeed. There’s a chance that as a family they’ll be forced to start again with nothing more than what they could fit onto a Heathrow luggage trolley.

Is he broken? Is he bitter? 

Not at all.

Telling me about all that he left behind in Zimbabwe - the boats, cars, house and business - he explained that, unlike some others who’d been through similar experiences, he decided not to destroy any of it. He left nothing in flames, left no holes in his boats, left no bitterness or anger. Just a hope that whoever now finds themselves in possession of his stuff would enjoy themselves.

So who’s the wealthiest? The guys having fun in the boats, the cars, the house and the nice leather chair in the corner office, or the man who left it all behind, whose smile and generosity are infectious?

We talk a lot about gifting in the world of worship. What would we look and sound like if we valued generosity more highly? 

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