Posted by Craig Borlase on 29 November 2013

 

Perhaps you love it. Perhaps you see it as a sign of true authenticity, a mark of a wholly creative songwriter. Those songs came from a deep place of personal devotion to God, and they articulate something profoundly honest and true about the worship leader’s faith. For you, the experience of joining with others as you sing songs that have been written by the worship leader is one of the best around.  

Or maybe you take a different view. You know a little about CCLI and are aware of the importance that good promotion plays with the product cycle. While you’re OK with all this when you’re paying to go to a worship event - complete with merch stalls by the exits - when you’re in church you find it jarring when a worship leader mainly plays their own stuff. Even without any sales-related cynicism, you find the symbolism off-putting: you’d rather that sung worship helps to offer up all our stories, rather than placing greater emphasis on just one person’s.

What’s your opinion?

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