Posted by Craig Borlase on 20 March 2015

Most of us are pretty good at getting excited about new opportunities. We talk about ‘testing doors’ and trust that God will open the ones that he wants opened and keep closed the ones he wants closed. 

This is all very well and good when we’re at the start of something, but what about when we’ve been in a role or assuming a responsibility for years? When the memory of the time when we knew our calling starts to fade, how do we know whether it’s time to persevere or to quit? How do faith and belief help us work things out?

For most of us in the west the act of believing in something is a mental activity. We choose to believe, to think the right kind of thoughts and build up the right kind of actions and reactions to demonstrate out belief. Maybe it has something to do with that line of Paul’s about how we should not conform to this world ‘but be transformed by the renewing of your mind.’  

The thing is, in Hebraic culture, belief runs along different tracks. Belief as understood by those who wrote the gospels, is a physical action. Belief is how we act. Belief is shown by what we do.

What about faith though? Well, the word "faith" in Hebrew means "to be supported." Faith is not something we produce, it's what God does for us. We are the recipients, God is the giver. 

Faith is what God does for us and belief is what we do in return. 

God called you to be a worship leader? That was a gift. It was faith. The day in and day out expression of that gift, the hard graft of practice and rehearsal and meetings and planning and preparing, that’s belief. 

Those moments when we realise that God is calling us to something are precious. They’re wonderful gifts in and of themselves. But if we spend too much time pining for them we can run the risk of not exercising our belief. 

A friend of mine suggests that when you’re not sure what you should be doing in a given situation you should return your thoughts to the last time that you were sure of God’s calling - your last gift of faith - and keep on in the same direction that God’s gift propelled you in. 

Is it time to quit? The question’s too small. Instead perhaps we should be asking this: is it time for a new revelation from God? Until then, maybe the best advice is to simply keep on going. 

We live in a disposable, fast-changing, constantly-reinventing culture. We all accept without question the fact that the product that’s heralded in 2015 as ‘the best thing we’ve ever done’ will in 2017 be rendered obsolete by the next ‘best thing we’ve ever done.’

The best thing God’s ever done doesn’t exist in some mythical future. 

It has already happened. 

In God’s economy perseverance doesn’t equal irrelevance. It equals belief. 

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