Posted by Craig Borlase on 6 March 2015

 

I was sitting in a Mancunian hipster cafe, talking to a friend who’d just come back from the barbers with a pretty severe side shave, sipping a chai (I was trying my best to blend in) when I first heard about The Good Christian Music Blog.

“It’s a YouTube channel run by some guy with 20,000 subscribers playing stuff that sounds like it’s on Radio One, made by people who dress like hipsters but who sing about being so desperately in love with Jesus that they can barely contain themselves.”

I honestly had no idea what to say. I mean, where do you start?

“It plays videos?”

“No. Just music. You know that’s how most young people listen to music now, don’t you?”

[Awkward sip of the chai from me.]

I’ve spent a bit of time listening to the songs since then.

I don’t get why some songs have annoying ads at the start of them, I don’t think that it’s really about making money, but I never really understand these things anyway.

I don’t get why these songs need to be paired up with Insta-Tactic shots of beautiful locations or beautiful people with beautiful owls.

What I do get is the fact that The Good Christian Music Blog is something different, and a lot of us have an awkward relationship with ‘different’, getting a little over excited at either end of the scale. But I like this different. I like the different sounds, the different approach. Different lyrics? I’m not so sure. These eternal and ancient truths have been around for a while, and there’s something comforting about that.

I’ve heard songs that have made me wince, songs that have made me smile, songs that have made me drag the little white dot hard left as soon as the song has finished.

How good is The Good Christian Music Blog?

I honestly don’t think that’s for one person to say.

And isn’t that the point?

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