Posted by Craig Borlase on 13 March 2015

In search of something inspirational to share, I took a trip to YouTube, sure that progressive church liturgy must have made it onto the site by now. 

If you’re looking for fancy gowns, incense, candles, secret doors hidden behind ornate wooden screens and harmonies so tight they’d make a barber’s shop quartet jealous, you’re in luck...

 

YouTube’s full of church liturgy, but most of it hasn’t changed for centuries. What if you want something that acknowledges that things like, I don’t know, the internet, television and electricity have all become part of normal life? Can ancient liturgy and modern life co-exist? 

This guys thinks so. Or, at least, he reckons that liturgy might be the answer to isolation and individualism. In the face of a changing world, he’s not so sure that we really need to go about changing things. 

 

 

Trouble is, when the the church goes for tradition there are a lot of people who feel like this...

 

 

To be fair, when the church tries to go contemporary, there are more than a few people who feel that it ends up closer to this...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3RJBd8zE48A

 

 

But then I found this. And it gave me hope. 

 

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