Posted by Craig Borlase on 9 August 2013

Remember the days when worship leaders used to take photos of themselves arriving at an airport, eating a pre-flight meal and then sound checking, before getting the film developed and showing the prints to all their friends?  

Or how about the times when worship leaders used to stand on top of their car in the car park after the service and shout wildly about how amazing the worship was, telling everyone within earshot how it ‘went off!’

Or what about the worship leaders who used to go around asking strangers to tell others how much they liked their songs? 

Nope, me neither. And yet all of the above behaviour can be seen in action today, thanks to social media.

Should we be concerned? Is all this new connectivity bringing out the worst in us? Should we steer clear?

Or maybe things have simply changed. People have always shared and talked and liked and laughed out loud, and social media is just another way of doing it. In fact, you might suggest that social media has a vital part to play in spreading worship worldwide.  What could be wrong with that?

What are your boundaries? Are there things that - as a worship leader - you don’t tweet about? What kind of behaviour makes you want to unfollow someone? And who does it well?

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What do you see when you look at this?

Twenty years is a long time in anyone’s life, but the pace of technology’s change is staggering as this 1993 / 2013 picture shows.

the Friday pickle - what do you do when someone’s on their phone while you’re leading worship?

You’re a worship leader, right? Does it fall within your job description to direct someone towards a better way of engaging with what the rest of the room doing? Or, to put it another way, how much force can you use from up there?

Melody or Lyrics - what matters more?

I’m convinced that melody and lyrics are equally powerful. Both have a role to play when it comes to taking us on a journey – both in terms of what our faith is and what our response could be. The two go together. Melody writers are just as valuable as lyric writers.