Posted by Craig Borlase on 25 July 2014

Take your time and complete the following sentence: a worship leader is like a…

Done it? Good.

If you’re clever enough to understand quantum physics you’ll know all about the Observer Effect. For the rest of us head-scratchers, the basic version is something like this: by examining a phenomenon we cause it to change.

Aaaaand what does this have to do with worship?

This: how we examine, and how we ultimately define ourselves has a massive impact on how we act. The story that we tell about ourselves ends up moulding us.

So, today’s pickle is this: how do we see ourselves? And what it say about our attitudes and assumptions?

If we think that a worship leader is like a best man at a wedding, are we in danger of being a little too self-important?

If we think that a worship leader is like a cheerleader in front of the bleachers, do we need to turn down the performance a little?

If we think that a worship leaders is like a gardener who helps the plants to grow as best they can, are we biting off more than we can chew?

What do you think? What best describes what you do?

More like this

Are We Worshipping Like The ‘pagans’?

Do we really need to invite Jesus into our gatherings? Is the Holy Spirit so absent that we must use songs and prayers to invite Him in? Is God so busy somewhere else that we need to invoke him to minister to our congregation? Is God like the ‘pagan gods’ who need to be summoned by rituals and worship?

Nathan Jess talks about Hearts of the Fathers on Songs of Praise

Nathan Jess recently appearing on the BBCs Songs of Praise programme. in the programme he talked about how his passion and talent for writing songs and leading worship was cultivated, as well as why so many great songs have come from Northern Ireland recently. It also featured a glimpse at the video for his song Hearts of the Fathers. We have the interview and full length music video here.

Worship in Times of Sorrow

Some of the hardest yet most inspiring times of worship occur during funerals. The raw emotions of sadness and loss are mixed with a sense of hope and eternal perspective. The book of Ecclesiastes says, “It is better to go to...