Posted by Craig Borlase on 25 July 2014

Take your time and complete the following sentence: a worship leader is like a…

Done it? Good.

If you’re clever enough to understand quantum physics you’ll know all about the Observer Effect. For the rest of us head-scratchers, the basic version is something like this: by examining a phenomenon we cause it to change.

Aaaaand what does this have to do with worship?

This: how we examine, and how we ultimately define ourselves has a massive impact on how we act. The story that we tell about ourselves ends up moulding us.

So, today’s pickle is this: how do we see ourselves? And what it say about our attitudes and assumptions?

If we think that a worship leader is like a best man at a wedding, are we in danger of being a little too self-important?

If we think that a worship leader is like a cheerleader in front of the bleachers, do we need to turn down the performance a little?

If we think that a worship leaders is like a gardener who helps the plants to grow as best they can, are we biting off more than we can chew?

What do you think? What best describes what you do?

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