Posted by Craig Borlase on 19 December 2014

Yes, that’s right; why so LITTLE time in song?

On the face of it, we charismatic Evangelicals are usually the ones accused of doing too much singing. There aren’t many who can touch us when it comes to back-to-back songfests, and you’re more likely to see a worship leader without an iPhone than you are to hear one leading the faith in sung liturgy.

Yet the Lutherans, the Episcopalians, even the high and not-so-high church Anglicans have all retained sung liturgy. And as this video makes clear, in an increasingly globalised world, maybe they’re onto something...

So what if the modern worship movement turned its attention to the prayers, truths and statements of faith that make up sung liturgy? What if we added all that we have learned about melody and arrangement and creating music to move the soul and brought it to the altar? Wouldn’t that be something worth singing about? Could that help give our services the kind of anchor that some feel they miss?

More like this

Messy Church

"Maybe it’s going to mean giving away some of the professionalism..." Tim Hughes on the vision at the heart of his new church.

the Friday pickle - do modern worship leaders admire the Levites just a little too much?

In these days of the modern worship movement, we often talk about the Levites. Set apart and salaried, they’re often exhibit A when it comes to making a case for the professional worship leader. But should they?

Lincoln Brewster: backstory to the new "Oxygen" album

Watch Lincoln's interview with American Bible Society where he talks about growing up in a less than ideal childhood home, learning to love guitar through the introduction of a mandolin, trusting God, and the backstory to his new "Oxygen" album.

Free Songs

with chords, lyrics and MP3