Posted by Craig Borlase on 19 December 2014

Yes, that’s right; why so LITTLE time in song?

On the face of it, we charismatic Evangelicals are usually the ones accused of doing too much singing. There aren’t many who can touch us when it comes to back-to-back songfests, and you’re more likely to see a worship leader without an iPhone than you are to hear one leading the faith in sung liturgy.

Yet the Lutherans, the Episcopalians, even the high and not-so-high church Anglicans have all retained sung liturgy. And as this video makes clear, in an increasingly globalised world, maybe they’re onto something...

So what if the modern worship movement turned its attention to the prayers, truths and statements of faith that make up sung liturgy? What if we added all that we have learned about melody and arrangement and creating music to move the soul and brought it to the altar? Wouldn’t that be something worth singing about? Could that help give our services the kind of anchor that some feel they miss?

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