Posted by Craig Borlase on 24 April 2013


With terrorism back on home soil and dominating the news, the role of worship songs might not seem like the most urgent topic. But when I walked into a funeral yesterday, I was reminded that whenever tragedy strikes - in whatever form - what we sing in church matters more than ever. And because of that fact, it raises questions like these…

* Why do none of our songs really express our pain, fear and sorrow?

* Are we worried that too much pain and sorrow in our songs will be make people think we’re lacking in faith?

* Does every song have to resolve with the happy ending of salvation, or would you sing a worship song that remained in the pain of grief throughout?

* Is there a place for an absence of words, letting the music express our darker emotions?

More like this

The Past Is The Present (Noah study part 1)

To celebrate the March 28th release of the movie Noah - and to do our bit for keeping the focus away from Russell Crowe’s accent or Emma Watson’s hair - we’ve got a five day series of Bible studies on...

My Jesus - song devotional

Chris Lawson-Jones talks about how the simple songs of his childhood helped to inspire the song My Jesus, which appears on Chris Sayburns album Saved By Grace.

A Promise (Noah study part 5)

What follows is another Biblical first. There are more to come, but this is the first Covenant - a contract, if you like - that God makes with His people through one of their own. It's a deal that still stands today: God promises never to wipe out all of human life again with a natural disaster. It does not revolve around a personal relationship, but instead is 'between me and the earth'. God's fresh start, His ultimate New Deal offers us security and the promise of something special: God's presence.