Posted by Craig Borlase on 21 July 2015

Money. Responsibility. Risk.

In other words; the usual stuff.

But that was back in April when his new church plant was facing the challenge of raising £2.3m to transform a cavernous but perfectly-located city centre venue into a creative and spiritual hub.

“I couldn’t see how this would happen,” he says. But with a third of the money raised already and building work begun, “I’m learning that if it’s God’s idea He’ll pay for it.”

Sometimes God calls us on an adventure that tests our tolerance for risk. He uses these moments of deep breaths and “it’s got to be you, God” prayers, creating within us the muscle memory that leads to a stronger, bolder, brighter faith.

But there are also times when God teaches us different skills, like the need to be able to discern when we need to fully engage those faith muscles and when to discern what’s not needed.

You can hear both those lessons in the song ‘Only The Brave’, and the title alone sets up an important question: what does it mean to be brave in God’s eyes?

“As we began to write the song I was thinking about David taking on Goliath and overcoming him through power of God. Out of our depth is never a bad place to be with God.”

“Sometimes you think it’s the people who are confident, gifted, together and sorted,” Tim says, “but the most brave are often the ones who step out in weakness, fear and uncertainty, trusting that God would come through for them.”

They’re the ones who’ve learned to recognise the difference between God’s plans and their own.

They’re the ones who trusted Him with the small stuff as well as the big.

And a lot the of time, they’re the ones who’ve been kept up at night, taking it all to God in prayer.

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