Posted by Craig Borlase on 13 February 2018

Picture Jesus on the cross. What do you see? Grace? I hope so. Love in the midst of pain? That’s there too.

But what about injustice? Look again and remember that there was not a shred of human justice as Jesus suffered the dreadful fate of a common criminal. And yet, that was the death that He chose.

VISIT SONG PAGE

‘… He was pierced for our transgressions, he was crushed for our iniquities; the punishment that brought us peace was upon him, and by his wounds we are healed’

[Isaiah 53:5]

  

Thought:

Grace sounds nice, doesn’t it? It sounds gentle and kind, and, well, graceful.

But there on the cross, grace sounded like agony. Grace looked like a body broken and mutilated. Grace felt like separation from God.

The Jewish authorities wanted this to be Jesus’ fate [Mk 11:18], and they were delighted when the local Roman government was prepared to go along with their plan – even to the extent of the scourge and crucifixion. Those whippings were so severe that they sometimes killed the victim off.

This brutal torture and death was handed out as the sentence for blasphemy. But that was not why Jesus was being punished. He was being punished because sometimes grace bleeds.

Invitation:

Have you ever known someone who took the rap for someone they wanted to protect? How did it make you feel? Imagine someone did that for you.

Imagine the One who did that for you.

Prayer:

Heavenly Father, the cross is a mystery. I don’t know how it all works, but I do know that you changed everything for me. My sin doesn’t count against me as it should, and it’s all because of Jesus.

Teach me to show more grace to others.

Amen

More like this

Is our version of good news really what people need to hear?

What we think about the Good News will affect the way we live our lives. If the Christian Good News is only about getting a ticket to heaven, then there is less chance we will be concerned about how we behave on earth...

Darlene Zschech’s Search For Authenticity - Part 1

When I think about authenticity and worship, I think about the ‘especially wicked sinner’ who Luke describes in Luke Chapter 7. When learning that Jesus Himself was at the Pharisee’s house, she broke out of the rules of the day, broke out of the shame of her past and present life...

the Friday Pickle - what's keeping the women out of worship?

There are far more women in church than men, yet why are there so many more male worship leaders? Are we guilty of sexism?