Posted by Craig Borlase on 10 June 2014

You see, at just the right time, when we were still powerless, Christ died for the ungodly. Very rarely will anyone die for a righteous person, though for a good person someone might possibly dare to die. But God demonstrates his own love for us in this: while we were still sinners, Christ died for us.

Since we have now been justified by his blood, how much more shall we be saved from God’s wrath through him! For if, while we were God’s enemies, we were reconciled to him through the death of his Son, how much more, having been reconciled, shall we be saved through his life! Not only is this so, but we also boast in God through our Lord Jesus Christ, through whom we have now received reconciliation.

Romans 5:6-11

 

Can you see the links and parallels between this passage and Isaiah 53? It's all there; we are all sinners, Jesus died for us, his blood paid the price, bringing us back out of exile and home to God.

It is through not only Jesus' death (6-8) but his resurrection (9-11) that we can now stand before God, secure that the debt has been paid, that the guilt and sin has been dealt with.

But what's all this stuff about God's enemies? Surely that can't be right? Well it is. Unbelief is hostility, choosing to reject God places us opposite him. But Jesus' actions were so loving, his arms so strong to hold around his wayward children that he made the first move. While we were against him, his death put things right. Remember all that stuff in Leviticus about the ways to pay for sin, about how sin demanded some form of exchange in order to be wiped out? Here we see how verse 11 makes it clear: Jesus has bought us back, has made the ultimate exchange and prepared the way for us to approach God.

Why was Jesus’ death ‘enough’ to sort out our relationship with God? What is the most difficult thing to understand about all of this?

Let’s keep on thinking of our songs as an offering, but let’s not shortchange God. He wants more - so much more.

 

 

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