Posted by Craig Borlase on 10 June 2014

A clever guy who probably had multiple PHDs once tried to quantify happiness. He suggested that one measure would be this. Imagine being invited to attend a party. Would you still go if neither you or anyone else would remember it, and there would be no records of you ever having attended? If you answer ‘yes’ becasue you’d still choose to go - to enjoy the experience for its own intrinsic values, rather than for any knock-on benefits you might receive - then it’ll probably make you happy. If your answer’s ‘no’, then don’t bother. 

I wonder what happens when we apply this (admittedly flimsy) formula to the art (or should that be science?) of writing worship songs. 

Would you still write them if nobody would know you had written them?

And would you still write them if nobody would ever remember them, talk about them or use them?

Would you still write if you did so simply for the audience of one?

Maybe that’s not such a flimsy formula after all. 

More like this

Song's Of The People...Capturing the Heart of a Church

Songs of praise and thanksgiving have been part of the faith since the beginning. “One generation shall commend Your works to another, and shall declare Your mighty acts,” he said, quoting Psalm 145. “They shall pour forth the fame of Your abundant goodness and shall sing aloud of Your righteousness.”

Expanding Our Expressions Of Worship

A few years ago, we formed a creative team at our church (Journey Church in Franklin, Tennessee) that was comprised of a graphic designer, a producer, musicians, painters, and pastors. We called ourselves “Cartography” because we were mapping the creative...

Time For a Change

Often you don't realise you're in a rut until you begin to climb out.  There's something wonderfully familiar about the coming and going of the four seasons - the regularity, stability and security they can bring. When the air gets colder...

Free Songs